Viewing entries tagged
ad agency new business

Is Your Agency Ready to Outsource Lead Generation?

Is Your Agency Ready to Outsource Lead Generation?

Recently, a client of mine asked me to help him evaluate a lead generation firm he was thinking about hiring. The lead gen firm had sent him an extensive questionnaire so it could gather enough information to create a set of persuasive sales messages. It included questions you’d expect: How do you describe your ideal client? What makes your agency different from competitors? Why do you do what you do?
 
My client asked me for my advice. Would I assess this firm and tell him what I thought of the questionnaire?
 
My feedback was that there was nothing wrong with the questionnaire. The question I had for him: Was he was happy with his answers? And, should the lead generator bring him quality leads, did he believe he was prepared to close the business?
 
I gave my client some advice on how to make sure his investment would pay off. If you’re considering outsourcing lead generation, then it might be good advice for you too. Read more

An Argument for - and against - Being a Specialist Agency

An Argument for - and against - Being a Specialist Agency

Earlier this month I was speaking to a group of agency owners and the topic of specialization came up, at least when it comes to business development. This elicited a comment from one of the agency owners in the audience. They had tried this specialist strategy and it didn’t work. In fact, it had the opposite effect — they couldn’t find enough new business opportunities to sustain the firm. What did I have to say to that?

(Gulp)

To be sure, I see enormous benefits to specializing when it comes to new business, but it’s not without its risks, as this agency owner pointed out. This month, I offer some hedges against that risk.

Discover Your Agency's New Business Strengths Profile to Win More Often

Discover Your Agency's New Business Strengths Profile to Win More Often

Fear and boredom are not a good combination, especially when they’re the overriding emotions you feel every time you confront the reality that you could be doing more to win new business for your agency.

I used to extol the virtues of a well-rounded business development program until I realized I was never going to get agency leaders to do things they didn’t like to do. I’d just be continually fighting the impossible fight against fear and boredom.

Instead, I learned that defining a strategy and set of tactics that were aligned to their strengths was the shortest, most efficient way to fill their pipeline. I also discovered that most small agency owners fit into one of four different new business personality types.

Which one are you? The answer may change your feelings about business development from fear and boredom to confidence and enthusiasm. Read more.

4 Fears that Sabotage Agency Business Development (and How to Face Them)

4 Fears that Sabotage Agency Business Development (and How to Face Them)

Going after new business puts you in a vulnerable position. There’s always a risk that you’ll be unable to persuade the other party to buy what you’re selling.

We don’t like feeling vulnerable or being rejected. In fact, it’s deeper than dislike. It’s straight-up fear. To avoid the fear, we might convince ourselves to stay in our safe place and keep doing whatever it is we’ve been doing (or not doing), no matter how unsatisfying or unproductive it is.

The devil you know…

Until a crisis shakes us out of complacency and forces us to act. And then we scramble to fix the crisis, dipping back into our network or lowering our price because we need a win.

What would change for your agency if you could take fear out of the equation?

Read more.

The First Day of the Rest of Your Ad Agency's Life

The First Day of the Rest of Your Ad Agency's Life

Your agency deserves to be noticed!

But you need to do your part too. You’re responsible for making it as easy as possible for your best customers to find you. A strong strategic positioning is one of the best ways to differentiate yourself. 

Landing on the right positioning for your agency can be emotional, soul-searching work, and emotion tends to cloud our judgment and compromise our objectivity.

What if you had a way to remove emotion from the equation? What if you had an equation to lead you to a clear articulation of your value?

Is 2018 the year you regain control over your agency’s new business destiny? 

Read more.

What 2017 Taught Me about Winning New Business in 2018

What 2017 Taught Me about Winning New Business in 2018

Have you ever said to yourself in the final weeks of December, “Wow, the advertising business got a whole lot easier this year!”?
 
I didn’t think so.
 
We often see the mounting complexity, shrinking budgets, and unexpected competitors more clearly than we see the opportunities.
 
But the opportunities are always there. Sometimes they’re more evident when we stop reacting for a moment and observe what’s around us. And this is a great time of year to do just that.
 
As we slide down the back end of December, here’s what I think did the most to shape the agency new business in 2017 and where opportunities may lie in 2018.

The More Marketing Changes, the More Clients Stay the Same

The More Marketing Changes, the More Clients Stay the Same

A couple of weeks ago I got to speak at The Drum’s Pitch Perfect conference, a one-day event devoted to helping ad agencies sharpen their new business skills.

There was some great content presented, and one of the best sessions featured four client-side marketers who graciously agreed to expose their underbellies to us. It’s always a lucky opportunity when we agency folk can ask clients candid questions about what we’re doing right and what we could do better.

In this case, I learned some new things, but mostly I was struck by how little things seem to change. Clients are trying just as hard as we are to stay on top of the constantly-shifting sands of marketing, not to mention the demands of their jobs.

Agencies are perfectly positioned to be a source of a help. So why do they often end up being more of a hindrance? 

How to Position Your Agency to Win New Business

How to Position Your Agency to Win New Business

The other day I got a phone call that made my week. 
 
One of my clients, the CEO of a small ad agency, called to tell me that the agency’s positioning strategy, a strategy that I first suggested more than three years ago and have encouraged (and sometimes cajoled) him to embrace ever since, just won him a major piece of business.
 
It was gratifying to me, of course, because it validated my business! But I was happier for him.
 
Committing to that positioning strategy had been a psychological hurdle. It fit like a Savile Row suit, but it required him to put a stake in the ground, and that meant potentially saying “no” to revenue if it meant working with the wrong kinds of clients.
 
It’s a very emotional decision for some agency owners, and emotion tends to cloud our judgment and compromise our objectivity.
 
But what if you had a way to test your positioning that puts emotion to the side? Read more.

Tell a Good Story, Win More New Business

Tell a Good Story, Win More New Business

Stories are engaging, memorable and repeatable—and this has big implications for winning over new clients. Wrapping your sales message in a story not only makes it easy for your prospects to understand your value, they’re also more likely to remember your message and repeat to others what they liked about you and why they want to hire you.

See the video.

What’s the Real Cost of Being a Generalist Ad Agency?

What’s the Real Cost of Being a Generalist Ad Agency?

Despite extolling the virtues of brand positioning to clients, many agencies fail to properly develop their own brands.

It’s a classic story of the shoemaker’s children who wear no shoes—a tired proverb, to be sure, but perennially appropriate.

But, we never hear how those children turned out. Did they grow up plagued by chronic foot problems? Did they become adults whom you could dress up but never take out?

Or, is it possible they turned out OK?

I’ve met too many agency CEOs, especially of small to mid-sized agencies, who find specialization such a hurdle (mentally, emotionally and operationally) that they end up not doing anything at all.

Rather than let those agencies languish, I’ve started developing alternative methods to at least help them raise their profiles and pursue clients in a consistent, sustainable way. 

In this month’s post, I share some of those methods, and offer a way to determine if being a generalist is worth the investment for your agency.

Is Your Ad Agency’s Next Client Another Ad Agency?

Is Your Ad Agency’s Next Client Another Ad Agency?

Our complex marketing ecosystem has resulted in a Cheesecake Factory menu of specialist agencies filling every marketing niche imaginable.

As these specialist agencies seek new growth, they’re turning to other agencies.

For example, a social media agency (let’s call it the Selling Agency) might partner with a digital agency (the Customer Agency) to fill a gap in the Customer Agency’s services. The Customer Agency can offer its client what it needs, the Selling Agency gets exposure to more potential clients on the other agency’s roster, and both make money. Hooray!

But there’s a big downside. The Selling Agency will never have as much influence over the client relationship as the Customer Agency will.

That leads to all sorts of hazards. In this post, I’ll tell what those hazards are and give you strategies you can use throughout the sales cycle to hedge against them.

Four Common Negotiating Mistakes Ad Agencies Make During a Pitch

Four Common Negotiating Mistakes Ad Agencies Make During a Pitch

When it comes to pitching for new business, agencies are so accommodating!

They put in late nights and give up holiday weekends. They divert their best teams from paying clients to do spec work. They put up with terrible briefs and minimal information.

Are they too willing to play on the client’s terms for the chance to compete for
new business?

I’ve identified four points in the pitch process where agencies should set their own terms, both for the sake of the future client relationship and their ability to pursue new business from other clients.